Tag Archives: Food

Book Review: Ocejo’s Master of Craft

I feel fortunate to have had the opportunity to carefully read Richard Ocejo’s super interesting book, Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy, for an Author-meets-critic session last Spring at the Eastern Sociology meetings. Ocejo’s book does an excellent job thinking through the labour underpinnings of urban hipster/foodie culture. It’s also an excellent example of how good sociology can creatively make connections between seemingly disparate phenomena — like butchers, cocktails, craft whiskey, and barbershops.

masters of craft

I wrote up a book review for Food, Culture and Society, which is now out and available here:

https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/ZBThuTNxFqnR5BesJnqM/full

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New Article: Meat, Mothering and Ethical Eating

An article I co-wrote with Kate Cairns on the topic of “meat and mothering” has been published by Agriculture and Human Values. Vol 35: 569-580. It can be downloaded for free directly from the journal (until mid-Sept) at this link:  http://www.springer.com/home?SGWID=0-0-1003-0-0&aqId=3451768&download=1&checkval=5899818bb273e12fee5729813ec2bc4b

In the article, we question the idea that “more consumer knowledge” will necessarily lead to altered, and more ethical food practices. Mothers are put in a difficult position in relation to children’s’ meat consumption: they feel pressure to teach kids where food comes from, but they also want to protect children from some of the harsh truths of animal slaughter.

brown wooden chopping board with meat on top

Photo by Fábio Bueno on Pexels.com

Disordered eating in the age of “foodies”

This wonderful review essay by Susan Pagani in the Los Angeles Review of Books makes me excited to read Feast: True Love in and out of the KitchenIt’s great to see the explicit connections Pagani makes between foodie culture, femininity and body control. Too often these issues operate in the shadows of foodie culture. Also, full disclosure: it’s very cool to see my work on food and femininity with Kate Cairns mentioned in the review!

feast

 

Calibrating Extremes: The Balancing Act of Maternal Foodwork

bananasKate Cairns, Merin Oleschuk and I recently wrote a short piece for the Gender & Society blog on the pressures mothers face when feeding children. We write: “When it comes to feeding children, mothers today must avoid the appearance of caring too little, or too much. Either extreme garners social stigma, although the penalties are far from equal.” Read the full piece here.

Small-P Politics: New article in British Journal of Sociology

I am happy to report that an article I have worked on with Emily Huddart Kennedy and John Parkins is now out in print in British Journal of Sociology.

 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/1468-4446.12614

The article is called “Small-p politics: how pleasurable, convivial and pragmatic political ideals influence engagement in eat-local initiatives”.

In the realm of local food, it’s often important to emphasize how food can be pleasurable and convivial. This is a pragmatic strategy for many reasons, and forces scholars to think carefully about what we mean by “politics”. Interviewing and observing food actors located in civil, state and market spheres in three Canadian cities, we describe a set of commonly articulated political ideals that inform and shape an engagement approach that we call “small-p politics”. We analyze why small-p politics is such an attractive option for food movement actors, but caution that narrowing the scope of tools and topics available for civic participation may compromise the ability for collective action to tackle barriers to justice and sustainability.

 

Book reviews for Food and Femininity

Cover of the book Food and Femininity by Kate Cairns and Josée Johnston.Professor Kate Cairns and I are always happy to hear when our recent book, Food and Femininity, has struck a chord with readers. Here is a compilation of the thoughtful reviews the book has received so far. We hope our contribution continues to push forward critical conversations about gender, feminism, food and inequality.

HuffPo article on pressure of cooking holiday family meals

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By Satya Murthy on Flickr Creative Commons: https://bitly.com/

The Huffington Post just published a short, seasonal piece I co-authored with PhD Candidate Merin Oleschuk and Professor Kate Cairns. In our article, we reflect on ways to alleviate some of the pressures behind the idealized family meal, particularly as they pertain to economic and gender inequality. Continue reading