Tag Archives: Cultural Sociology

Happy graduation to Dr. Sarah Cappeliez!

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Dr. Sarah Cappeliez and her mother at last month’s UofT graduation ceremony.

Congrats to Dr. Sarah Cappeliez, who graduated from UofT last month! I had the immense pleasure of supervising Sarah’s dissertation, entitled “More than just a Fine Drink: Processes of Cultural Translation, Taste Formation and Idealized Consumption in the Wine World.” Her research investigates winemaking practices and wine culture that are driven by the concept of “terroir,” which describes the unique taste arising from a combination of biophysical elements and agrarian practices in a particular place. Drawing on fieldwork in French and Canadian regional contexts, she examines the cultural sociology of how ideas, tastes and consumption practices travel and are adopted in new locations.

While we miss her brilliant intellect and down-to-earth warmth at UofT, we’re delighted that Sarah recently began a position as an Assistant Professor at Concordia University in Montréal. She is currently teaching classes in media and culture, including an introductory course on Sociology Through Film.

Check out part of Sarah’s terroir research in this excellent recent Poetics article.

 

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Narrow visions of sex and beauty

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Model, Paloma Eslesser, posing for Glossier (as part of their “body hero” product campaign).

I have teamed up with my friend and colleague, Judith Taylor to write a commentary on the legacy of Hugh Hefner. Definitions of feminine beauty are being broadened and contested (as we see in the Glossier model depicted here). Still, it seems important to continue to interrogate gendered double-standards that persist around physical appearance, sex, and the body.

https://theconversation.com/hugh-hefners-legacy-narrow-visions-of-sex-and-beauty-85083

 

Journal article by Merin Oleschuk on foodies of colour

merin01Merin Oleschuk, one of the PhD candidates I’m supervising, just published a brilliant article in Cultural Sociology called “Foodies of color: Authenticity and exoticism in omnivorous food culture.” Her article focuses on the framing of particular foods as ‘authentic’ and/or ‘exotic,’ and how foodies of colour in Toronto reproduce, adjust to, and resist ethnoracial inequalities in gourmet food culture. Check out this write-up on the story behind Merin’s research.